[Recap: The ‘evolution’ angle] Television is a thing of the past. Do you agree?

24 10 2011

This essay is quite similar to a previously-discussed essay:

The book has no place in modern society. Discuss.

Here’s an excerpt from a post that dealt with the abovementioned question on books:

Stand: There is a place

Counter-argument: Some argue that books have no place due to the rise of alternatives to books (e-books, the internet, etc.) which have edged books out.

Rebuttal: Thanks to the internet, the traditional book might no longer have a place in our libraries (or in Borders). However, the very fact that e-books are on the rise shows that there still is a place for books because e-books are, after all, books too. While there may not be a place for the traditional book, there certainly is a place – and a growing one at that – for the evolved descendent of the paperback: e-books in one’s Kindle or iPad.

Conclusion: Therefore, though traditional books might have lost their place, the book certainly has not, for it has merely evolved and adapted to fill a new “ecological niche” in society.

 

Applying this approach to the question on whether TVs are a thing of the past, one could argue:

Television is a thing of the past. Do you agree?

Stand: Not a thing of the past

Counter-argument: Some argue that television is a thing of the past due to the rise of alternatives to televisions (internet TV, YouTube, online streaming of full episodes, alternative forms of entertainment such as computer games, etc.) which have edged out television.

Rebuttal: Thanks to internet television, the traditional notion of a television in one’s living room might be a thing of the past. However, the very fact that there is a rising demand for internet television, with iTunes and Megavideo charging low rates to stream and download full episodes, shows that television is not a thing of the past because internet television is, after all, television too. While the traditional concept of a television in the living room might be a thing of the past, the evolved descendants of the television – internet television viewed on our laptops, iPads and even smartphones – are certainly a thing of the present, and likely future too.

Conclusion: Therefore, though traditional notions of the television might be a thing of the past, the overarching concept of a television certainly has not, for it has merely evolved and adapted to fill a new “ecological niche” in society.

A similar “the television-has-evolved” angle could also consider the following:

  • While people might turn to alternative forms of entertainment such as Playstation games and the Wii, these new forms of entertainment need to be hooked up to our “old-fashioned” televisions. Thus, even if we do not watch broadcast programmes on TV as much, this doesn’t mean that we don’t use the TV for other purposes.
  • TV developers are well aware of the competition from the internet, and are adding functions to your standard living room TV set – new models can now be used to surf the internet as well, TiVo was developed to allow people to watch programmes at their conveneince, etc.
  • TV developers are upgrading TVs to make the viewing experience unlike anything one can currently experience from a lowly laptop – 3D televisions, LED televisions, HD televisions, large screens (far larger than a laptop), compatibility with fancy home theatre systems.
  • Large, ultra-thin, high-end televisions being hung on one’s wall as a status symbol

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